Easy-peel "Soft Boiled" Sous Vide Eggs

71.11°C (160° F)
Temperature
Sous vide time
4 People
Serves
Medium
Difficulty

Ingredients

Main ingredients

  • Fresh, organic, free-range eggs (still in shell at refrigerator temperature)

Ice bath

  • As much ice as eggs
  • Bowl of cold water (deep enough to submerge the eggs & ice)

Comments

Kyle Hildebrant
I don't really think you can all that soft-white texture hard-boiled, can you?
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
The whites become firm, custard like with the 160°F temperature. Edible as a peel and eat breakfast/snack much like a hard-boiled egg, but tastier!
almost 2 years ago
S
stephen
Good egg, but the quote marks around "hard boiled" are well deserved. The egg whites were very runny. Yolk was firm. Delicious egg though.
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
I've performed this recipe dozens of times. It's unbelievable how much eggs vary over seasons and even within a carton. This method reveals to true qualities of the egg :) Older eggs will produce softer whites. Use the very freshest eggs. I try to get eggs with a "use by" date ~three weeks out.
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
Changed the name to "Soft Boiled" to help folks understand what they're making.
almost 2 years ago
BF
Brady Francisco-FitzMaurice
Love the texture! But I don't love eating cold eggs. How do you recommend heating after the ice bath?
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
To re-warm the egg, first remove the shell (heating in the shell may result in difficult peeling), then microwave for 30-60 seconds. This may affect the texture. Experiment to find your ideal egg :) Science!
almost 2 years ago
BM
Beth Morgan
Can't get my unit to link
12 months ago

Directions

  1. Cook the eggs: Once the water reaches target temperature, take the eggs out of refrigeration, and submerge them for the cook time.
  2. Shock the eggs: As the cook time completes, make the ice bath, & transfer the eggs directly from the hot water to the ice bath. Gently agitate to cool quickly & evenly.
  3. Use or Store the eggs: After ten to twenty minutes in the ice bath, remove and refrigerate or use immediately.
  4. Peel an egg: gently tap the egg on a hard surface around its narrow equator, so that it separates into two clean hemispheres. The egg will fall out of the shell thanks to the shocking method.

Comments

Kyle Hildebrant
I don't really think you can all that soft-white texture hard-boiled, can you?
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
The whites become firm, custard like with the 160°F temperature. Edible as a peel and eat breakfast/snack much like a hard-boiled egg, but tastier!
almost 2 years ago
S
stephen
Good egg, but the quote marks around "hard boiled" are well deserved. The egg whites were very runny. Yolk was firm. Delicious egg though.
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
I've performed this recipe dozens of times. It's unbelievable how much eggs vary over seasons and even within a carton. This method reveals to true qualities of the egg :) Older eggs will produce softer whites. Use the very freshest eggs. I try to get eggs with a "use by" date ~three weeks out.
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
Changed the name to "Soft Boiled" to help folks understand what they're making.
almost 2 years ago
BF
Brady Francisco-FitzMaurice
Love the texture! But I don't love eating cold eggs. How do you recommend heating after the ice bath?
almost 2 years ago
Mars Hall
To re-warm the egg, first remove the shell (heating in the shell may result in difficult peeling), then microwave for 30-60 seconds. This may affect the texture. Experiment to find your ideal egg :) Science!
almost 2 years ago
BM
Beth Morgan
Can't get my unit to link
12 months ago