Turkey Cassoulet

65°C (149° F)
Temperature
Sous vide time
4 People
Serves
Medium
Difficulty
Nomiku
Source

Ingredients

Turkey

  • 2 large turkey legs, about 3 pounds
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Beans

  • 2 cups (1 pound) dried white beans, such as navy or cannellini
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1 quart turkey or chicken stock (if using store-bought, use low sodium)
  • 1 carrot, peeled and halved lengthwise
  • 1 branch celery
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 parsley stems
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 1 tablespoon duck fat or canola oil
  • 2 oz bacon or pancetta cut into ¼ inch dice
  • 1 large Spanish onion, cut into ¼ inch dice
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 ounces Italian tomato paste
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 3 cups panko bread crumbs
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter or duck fat
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • Flakey salt, such as Maldon or fleur de sel

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Directions

  1. The night before you plan to make your cassoulet, you need to soak the beans and salt the turkey.
  2. For the beans, dissolve the 2 tablespoons of kosher salt in the 2 quarts of water in a medium bowl. Add the beans and cover the bowl; leave the beans to soak overnight at room temperature. (You may have heard not to salt beans before they’re cooked, but adding salt to the soaking water actually helps them become tender when cooking).
  3. Season the turkey legs with the kosher salt, sugar, and black pepper to taste, then place them into a 1-gallon freezer-safe zip bag and seal using the water displacement method. Refrigerate overnight.
  4. The next day, preheat your Nomiku water bath to 65ºC (149ºF).
  5. Take the sealed turkey legs from the refrigerator and lower into the bath. Cook for 6 hours.
  6. About an hour before the turkey is finished, prepare the beans. Drain the soaking water and transfer the beans to a large stockpot. Add the stock, carrot, celery, bay leaf, parsley, and thyme to the pot. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to a simmer, cover the pot, and cook until the beans are completely tender, about 1 hour (if the broth evaporates too much and the liquid doesn’t cover the beans, just add water). Remove from the heat, discard the vegetables and herbs (which have lent their flavor to the beans), and set aside.
  7. Once cooked, remove the turkey from the water bath and set aside to cool, at least 15 minutes.
  8. Preheat your oven to 400ºF.
  9. While the turkey cools, heat the duck fat or canola oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the bacon or pancetta to the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the bacon has turned light golden brown and rendered most of its fat, about 3-4 minutes (you don’t want it completely crispy).
  10. Add the onions and garlic, along with a pinch of salt, and sweat them without browning, stirring occasionally, until they’re completely soft, about 10 minutes. Stir in the tomato past and cook for 1 minute, then stir in the white wine and bring it to a simmer. Remove from the heat. At this point, you can add this mixture to the pot of cooked beans.
  11. Next, remove the turkey meat from the zip bag and use your fingers to separate the meat, discarding the bones, skin, and connective tissue. Add the picked turkey meat to the pot of beans and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  12. Transfer the turkey and bean mixture to a large baking dish (we used a 13” X 8” Pyrex pan), then sprinkle the bread crumbs on top. You need a generous layer of crumbs to form a proper crust: too little and they’d just absorb the broth without being able to crisp. Drizzle the top of the crumbs with the melted butter or duck fat, then transfer to the oven. Bake until the top is deep golden brown and crisp (some of the broth underneath will likely bubble through—that’s a good thing!) 20-30 minutes.
  13. Remove the dish from the oven, sprinkle with the parsley and flakey salt, and chow down on turkey: part 2.

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